Russia warns that it will Intervene in Eastern Ukraine – Washington Promises to ‘Support’ Kiev

Russia warns that it will Intervene in Eastern Ukraine - Washington Promises to 'Support' Kiev

Today Russia made it very clear that any attempt by Kiev to use the military against separatists in Eastern Ukraine would result in an armed response.

Russia warns that it will Intervene in Eastern Ukraine - Washington Promises to

Today Russia made it very clear that any attempt by Kiev to use the military against separatists in Eastern Ukraine would result in an armed response.

The stakes are rapidly rising in Eastern Ukraine as Russia warned today that they will treat any attacks against Russian citizens as an attack against the Russian Federation and respond accordingly.

“Russian citizens being attacked is an attack against the Russian Federation,” Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said in an interview today. “If we are attacked, we would certainly respond.”

What that “response” would entail was left open ended, but his reference to the 2008 war over Georgia’s breakaway South Ossetia region makes it very clear that a full scale military operation is on the table.

This statement by Lavrov was clearly intended to send a warning to the provisional government in Ukraine. This past week the interim president in Kiev announced plans for a new wave of military operations against separatists strongholds in the East. This comes after the first attempt to reclaim the region ended in utter failure.

“Security forces are in a state of disorganization and demoralization,” said Kiev-based political analyst Volodymyr Fesenko. “Today, most of them don’t want to fight for anyone because they don’t know who is going to win tomorrow and how all of this will end.”

In Fesenko’s view, it’s impossible for Ukraine to restore control over the insurgent region by force.

“Now the task is to block the spread of the separatist virus,” he said.

Characterizing the Ukrainian military as disorganized and demoralized is misleading. Corporate media outlets and U.S. politicians have gravitated towards this excuse to avoid addressing the real issue: Kiev’s legitimacy problem. The provisional government in Ukraine came to power in a coup that has Washington’s fingerprints all over it. This isn’t a minor detail that can be easily overlooked, especially for the Ukrainian soldiers who are being ordered into the East to crush the separatists.

Biden visited Kiev this week and pledged Washington’s support, however such promises ring empty when both NATO and the Obama administration have already admitted that they are unwilling to engage Russia militarily. In that context the announcement that the U.S. is sending about 600 ground troops to Eastern Europe this week to “reassure” allies can only be interpreted as a public relations move designed to give the impression that action is being taken.

A new round of “sanctions” against Russia are being discussed and may begin sometime in the next week, but Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev has already made it clear that these measures will have no influence on policy.

You can, of course, continue to expand the ‘black list’, but it will lead absolutely nowhere,” the Prime Minister told member of the State Duma on Tuesday. “But if a number of our partners still choose this path [of sanctions], we will have no other choice, but to rely on our own resources. And we shall win in the end,”

In this context the provisional government in Kiev is trapped. Backing down from their threat to crush the separatists in the East will be viewed as a sign of weakness, and moving forward with the attack will invite a humiliating military defeat. That a few Russian individuals and companies get punished by the U.S. afterwards will be of little help.

Sources
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